The Dead House – Episode 12 – Under The Knife

In Episode 12 of Under The Knife, I explore the grim reality facing medical students in earlier centuries when they first entered the dissection room, or “dead house,” as they called it.

Don’t forget you can now pre-order my book THE BUTCHERING ART by clicking here! And please subscribe to my YouTube Channel, and like/comment on the video!

The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice: 2 Million Hits!

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I was working on a blog post the other day when I saw the counter on my site reach 2 million hits. I had to blink twice. Two million hits?! I never dreamt that there would be so much interest in my work when I began The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice in 2010. Thanks to everyone who has supported me on this journey. It is one of my greatest pleasures in life to share medical history with you. In honor of this occasion, I’ve put together some fun stats about the blog. And don’t forget that if you’re in the US, you can now pre-order my upcoming book The Butchering Art by clicking here. 

Total Hits: 2,009,331

  • Best Day: July 27, 2014 (33,163 hits)
  • Best Month: July, 2014 (82,555 hits)

Top 3 Most Popular Articles

Social Media

  • Twitter: 24,622 (Click here to follow)
  • Facebook: 43,735 (Click here to follow)
  • Instagram: 70,586 (Click here to follow)
  • YouTube: 13,134 (Click here to subscribe)
  • Blog: 8,107 (Subscribe to the right)

Total Words Written: 142,356

Number of Countries & Territories Reached: 212.

  • Some of the most unusual include Congo, the Palestinian Territories, Syria, Micronesia, Iran, Tajikistan, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Antarctica, and my favorite: Vatican City. I see you, His Holiness!

Most Popular Search Terms: Guillotine, Plague Doctor, Neurofibromatosis, Vivisection, Corpse Medicine, Sweeney Todd, Barber-Surgeon, Syphilis Nose, The Knick, Mummy, Mermaid Syndrome.

Above artwork by the incredible cartoonist Adrian Teal

Lincoln’s Corpse – Episode 11 – Under The Knife

In Episode 11 of Under The Knife, I explore the origins of the modern funeral industry beginning with the American Civil War and the unusual embalming & burial of President Abraham Lincoln.

Don’t forget you can now pre-order my book THE BUTCHERING ART by clicking here! And please subscribe to my YouTube Channel, and like/comment on the video!

 

Pre-Order My Book! The Butchering Art

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I’m thrilled to reveal the cover for the US edition of my forthcoming book, THE BUTCHERING ART, which will be published by FSG on October 17th.

The book delves into the grisly world of Victorian surgery and transports the reader to a period when a broken leg could result in amputation, when giving birth in a squalid hospital was extraordinarily dangerous, and when a minor injury could lead to a miserable death. Surgeons—lauded for their brute strength and quick knives—rarely washed their hands or their instruments, and carried with them a cadaverous smell of rotting flesh, which those in the profession cheerfully referred to as “good old hospital stink.” At a time when surgery couldn’t have been more dangerous, an unlikely figure stepped forward: Joseph Lister, a young, melancholic Quaker surgeon. By making the audacious claim that germs were the source of all infection—and could be treated with antiseptics—he changed the history of surgery forever.

Many of you have been devoted readers of my blog since its inception in 2010, and I can’t thank you enough for your continued interest in my work. Writing a book has been the next logical step for a very long time. The idea of telling this particular story arose during a very difficult period in my life when my writing career was at risk. It is therefore with great pride (and some trepidation) that I am turning this book loose into the world, and humbly ask you to consider pre-ordering it. All pre-orders count towards first-week sales once THE BUTCHERING ART is released, and therefore give me a greater chance of securing a place on bestseller lists in October. I would be hugely grateful for your support.

Pre-order from any one of these vendors using the links below:

*Please note that THE BUTCHERING ART will also be published by Penguin in the United Kingdom, as well as several other publishers around the world. I’ll be revealing covers for these foreign editions in the coming months, along with information on where to buy a copy.

Syphilis: A Little Valentine’s Day Love Story

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Photo Credit: The Royal College of Surgeons of England 

We don’t know much about her. We don’t even know her name. What we do know is that the woman who wore the above prosthetic in the mid-19th century was suffering from a severe case of syphilis.

Before the discovery of penicillin in 1928, syphilis was an incurable disease. Its symptoms were as terrifying as they were unrelenting. Those who suffered from it long enough could expect to develop unsightly skin ulcers, paralysis, gradual blindness, dementia and “saddle nose,” a grotesque deformity which occurs when the bridge of the nose caves into the face.

stlcfo00239This deformity was so common amongst those suffering from the pox (as it was sometimes called) that “no nose clubs” sprung up in London. On 18 February 1874, the Star reported: “Miss Sanborn tells us that an eccentric gentleman, having taken a fancy to see a large party of noseless persons, invited every one thus afflicted, whom he met in the streets, to dine on a certain day at a tavern, where he formed them into a brotherhood.”[1] The man, who assumed the name Mr. Crampton for these clandestine parties, entertained his “noseless’” friends every month until he died a year later, at which time the group “unhappily dissolved.”[2]

The 19th century was particularly rife with syphilis. Because of its prevalence, both physicians and surgeons treated victims of the disease. Many treatments involved the use of mercury, hence giving rise to the saying: “One night with Venus, a lifetime with Mercury.” Mercury could be administered in the form of calomel (mercury chloride), an ointment, a steam bath or pill. Unfortunately, the side effects could be as painful and terrifying as the disease itself. Many patients who underwent mercury treatments suffered from extensive tooth loss, ulcerations and neurological damage. In many cases, people died from significant mercury poisoning.

For those determined to avoid the pox altogether, condoms made from animal membrane and secured with a silk ribbon were available [below], but these were outlandishly expensive. Moreover, many men shunned them for being uncomfortable and cumbersome. In 1717, the surgeon, Daniel Turner, wrote:

The Condum being the best, if not only Preservative our Libertines have found out at present; and yet by reason of its blunting the Sensation, I have heard some of them acknowledge, that they had often chose to risk a Clap, rather than engage cum Hastis sic clypeatis [with spears thus sheathed].[3]

13Everyone blamed each other for the burdensome condom. The French called it “la capote anglaise” (the English cape), while the English called it the “French letter.” Even more unpleasant was the fact that once one procured a condom, he was expected to use it repeatedly. Unsurprisingly, syphilis continued to rage despite the growing availability of condoms during the Victorian period.

Which brings me back to the owner of the prosthetic nose. Eventually, she lost her teeth and palate after prolonged exposure to mercury treatments. Her husband—who may have been the source of her suffering—finally died from the disease, leaving her a widow. But it wasn’t all doom and gloom for the poor, unfortunate Mrs X.

According to records at the Royal College of Surgeons in London, the woman found another suitor despite her deformities. After the wedding, she sought out the physician, James Merryweather, and sold the contraption to him for £3. The reason? Her new husband liked her just the way she was – no nose and all!

And that, kind readers, is a true Valentine’s Day love story…Ignore the part where she most certainly transmitted the disease to her new lover.

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1. Origin of the No Nose Club. Star, Issue 1861 (18 February 1874), p. 3.
2. Ibid.
3. Daniel Turner, Syphilis: A Practical Treatise on the Venereal Disease (1717), p. 74.

Under the Knife, Episode 10 – Al Capone’s Grave

In Episode 10 of Under the Knife, I hit the road to visit the grave of the infamous American gangster, Al Capone. Learn about Capone’s torturous descent into madness caused by advance stage syphilis, and his eventual death and burial that left his grave exposed to vandals.

If you enjoy the series, please consider becoming a patron of my project by clicking here. And don’t forget to subscribe to my YouTube Channel, and like/comment on the video!

The Surgeon who Operated on Himself

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Leonid Ivanovich Rogozov (pictured above and below right) knew he was in trouble when he began experiencing intense pain in lower right quadrant of his abdomen. He had been feeling unwell for several days, but suddenly, his temperature skyrocketed and he was overcome by waves of nausea. The 27-year-old surgeon knew it could only be one thing: appendicitis.

blog3The year was 1961, and under normal circumstances, appendicitis was not life-threatening. But Rogozov was stuck in the middle of the Antartica, surrounded by nothing but thousands of square miles of snow and ice, far from civilization. He was one of thirteen researchers who had just embarked on the sixth Soviet Antarctic Expedition.

And he was the only doctor.

At first, Rogozov resigned himself to his fate. He wrote in his diary:

It seems that I have appendicitis. I am keeping quiet about it, even smiling. Why frighten my friends? Who could be of help? A polar explorer’s only encounter with medicine is likely to have been in a dentist’s chair.

He was right that there was no one who could help. Even if there had been another research station within a reasonable distance, the blizzard raging outside Rogozov’s own encampment would have prevented anyone from reaching him. An evacuation by air was out of the question in those treacherous conditions. As the situation grew worse, the young Soviet surgeon did the only thing he could think of: he prepared to operate on himself.

Rogozov was not the first to attempt a self-appendectomy. In 1921, the American surgeon Evan O’Neill Kane undertook an impromptu experiment after he too was diagnosed with a severe case of appendicitis. He wanted to know whether invasive surgery performed under local anesthetic could be painless. Kane had several patients who had medical conditions which prevented them from undergoing general anesthetic. If he could remove his own appendix using just a local anesthetic, Kane reasoned that he could operate on others without having to administer ether, which he believed was dangerous and overused in surgery.

Lying in the operating theater at the Kane Summit Hospital, the 60-year-old surgeon announced his intentions to his staff. As he was Chief of Surgery, no one dared disagree with him. Kane proceeded by administering novocaine—a local anesthetic that had only recently replaced the far more dangerous drug, cocaine—as well as adrenalin into his abdominal wall. Propping himself up on pillows and using mirrors, he began cutting into his abdomen. At one point, Kane leaned too far forward and part of his intestines popped out. The seasoned surgeon calmly shoved his guts back into their rightful place before continuing with the operation. Within thirty minutes, he had located and removed the swollen appendix. Kane later said that he could have completed the operation more rapidly had it not been for the staff flitting around him nervously, unsure of what they were supposed to do.

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Emboldened by his success, Kane decided to repair his own inguinal hernia under local anesthetic eleven years later. The operation was carried out with the the press in attendance. This operation was more dangerous than the appendectomy because of the risk of puncturing the femoral artery. Unfortunately, this second surgery was tricky, and ended up taking well over an hour. Kane never fully regained his strength. He eventually came down with pneumonia, and died three months later.

Back in Antartica, Rogozov enlisted the help of his colleagues, who assisted with mirrors and retractors as the surgeon cut deep into his own abdomen. After forty-five minutes, Rogozov began experiencing weakness and vertigo, and had to take short breaks. Eventually he was able to remove the offending organ and sew up the incision (pictured below, recovering). Miraculously, Rogozov was able to return to work within two weeks.

blog4The incident captured the imagination of the Soviet public at the time. After he returned from the expedition, Rogozov was awarded the Order of the Red Banner of Labour. The incident also brought about a change in policy. Thereafter, extensive health checks became mandatory for personnel before their departure for Antartica was sanctioned.

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