The Butchering Art – UK Cover Reveal!

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I’m thrilled to reveal the UK cover for my upcoming book THE BUTCHERING ART, which will be published by Allen Lane, an imprint of Penguin, on October 17th. The book tells the story of the surgeon Joseph Lister and his quest to transform the brutal world of Victorian surgery through antisepsis.

Fitzharris_ButcheringArt_JKFFor those of you who are familiar with the US cover (right), you’ll notice a lot of similarities. The US cover features a painting by the 19th-century artist Thomas Eakins. It depicts the surgeon Samuel Gross, who didn’t believe in the existence of germs and made a point of not using Lister’s antiseptic techniques in the operating theater. The painting is dark and bloody, and the surgeons are all wearing their everyday clothing. These men are the last “butchers” of their profession – men who were lauded for their brute strength and speed, and who didn’t wash their hands or their instruments between operations.

In contrast, the UK cover (above) features a second painting by Eakins, this one completed a decade later after Lister triumphs and germ theory is finally accepted by the medical community. This painting is lighter, brighter, and there is a sense of cleanliness and hygiene (note: the publisher has stylized the original painting to give it a slightly modern look here). I think it’s brilliant that the US and UK covers are in conversation with one another. So here’s the important part! I would be HUGELY GRATEFUL if you would consider pre-ordering the book today if you’re in the UK. Pre-orders are especially crucial at the start of a writer’s career as they increase my chance at getting onto bestseller lists when the time comes. Click HERE.

And don’t forget you can also pre-order the US edition by clicking HERE. Info on further foreign editions to come!

The Wandering Womb: Female Hysteria through the Ages

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The word “hysteria” conjures up an array of images, none of which probably include a nomadic uterus wandering aimlessly around the female body. Yet that is precisely what medical practitioners in the past believed was the cause behind this mysterious disorder. The very word “hysteria” comes from the Greek word hystera, meaning “womb,” and arises from medical misunderstandings of basic female anatomy.

Today, hysteria is regarded as a physical expression of a mental conflict and can affect anyone regardless of age or gender. [1] Centuries ago, however, it was attributed only to women, and believed to be physiological (not psychological) in nature.

enhanced-1129-1458094853-1For instance, Plato believed that the womb—especially one which was barren—could become vexed and begin wandering throughout the body, blocking respiratory channels causing bizarre behavior. [2] This belief was ubiquitous in ancient Greece. The physician Aretaeus of Cappadocia went so far as to consider the womb “an animal within an animal,” an organ that “moved of itself hither and thither in the flanks.” [3] The uterus could move upwards, downwards, left or right. It could even collide with the liver or spleen. Depending on its direction, a wandering womb could cause all kinds of hell. One that traveled upwards might cause sluggishness, lack of strength, and vertigo in a patient; while a womb that moved downwards could cause a person to feel as if she were choking. So worrisome was the prospect of a wandering womb during this period, that some women wore amulets to protect themselves against it. [4]

The womb continued to hold a mystical place in medical text for centuries, and was often used to explain away an array of female complaints. The 17th-century physician William Harvey, famed for his theories on the circulation of the blood around the heart, perpetuated the belief that women were slaves to their own biology. He described the uterus as “insatiable, ferocious, animal-like,” and drew parallels between “bitches in heat and hysterical women.” [5] When a woman named Mary Glover accused her neighbor Elizabeth Jackson of cursing her in 1602, the physician Edward Jorden argued that the erratic behavior that drove Mary to make such an accusation was actually caused by noxious vapors in her womb, which he believed were slowly suffocating her. (The courts disagreed and Elizabeth Jackson was executed for witchcraft shortly thereafter.)

So what could be done for hysteria in the past?

e789fb4fb909b2a53918eb9a18b08db3Physicians prescribed all kinds of treatments for a wayward womb. These included sweet-smelling vaginal suppositories and fumigations used to tempt the uterus back to its rightful place. The Greek physician Atreaus wrote that the womb “delights…in fragrant smells and advances towards them; and it has an aversion to foetid smells, and flees from them.” Women were also advised to ingest disgusting substances—sometimes containing repulsive ingredients such as human or animal excrement—in order to coax the womb away from the lungs and heart. In some cases, physical force was used to correct the position of a wandering womb (see image, right). For the single woman suffering from hysteria, the cure was simple: marriage, followed by children. Lots and lots of children.

Today, wombs are no longer thought to wander; however, medicine still tends to pathologize the vagaries of the female reproductive system. [6] Over the course of several thousand years, the womb has become less of a way to explain physician ailments, and more of a way to explain psychological disfunction—often being cited as the reason behind irrationality and mood swings in women. Has the ever-elusive hysteria brought on by roving uteri simply been replaced by the equally intangible yet mysterious PMS? I’ll let you decide.

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You can now pre-order my book THE BUTCHERING ART by clicking here. THE BUTCHERING ART follows the story of Joseph Lister as he attempts to revolutionize the brutal world of Victorian surgery through antisepsis. Pre-orders are incredibly helpful to new authors. Info on how to order foreign editions coming soon. Your support is greatly appreciated. 

 

 

1. Mark J Adair, “Plato’s View of the ‘Wandering Uterus,’” The Classical Journal 91:2 (1996), p. 153.
2. G. S. Rousseau, “‘A Strange Pathology:’ Hysteria in the Early Modern World, 1500-1800” in Hysteria Beyond Freud (1993), p.104. Originally qtd in Heather Meek, “Of Wandering Wombs and Wrongs of Women: Evolving Concepts of Hysteria in the Age of Reason,” English Studies in Canada 35:2-3 (June/September 2009), p.109.
3. Quoted in Matt Simon, “Fantastically Wrong: The Theory of the Wandering Wombs that Drove Women to Madness,” Wired (7 May 2014).
4. Robert K. Ritner, “A Uterine Amulet in the Oriental Institute Collection,” Journal of Near Eastern Studies 45:3 (Jul. 1984), pp.209-221. For more on the fascinating subject of magical amulets, see Tom Blaen, Medical Jewels, Magical Gems: Precious Stones in Early Modern Britain (2012).
5. Rousseau, “A Strange Pathology,” p. 132.
6. Mary Lefkowitz, “Medical Notes: The Wandering Womb,” The New Yorker (26 February 1996).

The Reusable Condom – Episode 13 – Under The Knife

 

In Episode 13 of Under The Knife, I discuss the history behind reusable condoms, and the terrible diseases that made them necessary in earlier centuries. The video may or may not also involve me wearing an inflatable condom costume…

Don’t forget you can now pre-order my book THE BUTCHERING ART by clicking here! And please subscribe to my YouTube Channel, and like/comment on the video!

Houses of Death: Walking the Wards of a Victorian Hospital

9deb7918e7e1d5281d6cfba4eafb711dThe following blog post relates to my forthcoming book THE BUTCHERING ART, which you can pre-order here

Today, we think of the hospital as an exemplar of sanitation. However, during the first half of the nineteenth century, hospitals were anything but hygienic. They were breeding grounds for infection and provided only the most primitive facilities for the sick and dying, many of whom were housed on wards with little ventilation or access to clean water. As a result of this squalor, hospitals became known as “Houses of Death.”

L0059152 Trade card for a 'Bug Destroyer' Andrew Cooke, LondonThe best that can be said about Victorian hospitals is that they were a slight improvement over their Georgian predecessors. That’s hardly a ringing endorsement when one considers that a hospital’s “Chief Bug-Catcher”—whose job it was to rid the mattresses of lice—was paid more than its surgeons in the eighteenth century. In fact, bed bugs were so common that the “Bug Destroyer” Andrew Cooke [see image, left] claimed to have cleared upwards of 20,000 beds of insects during the course of his career.[1]

In spite of token efforts to make them cleaner, most hospitals remained overcrowded, grimy, and poorly managed. The assistant surgeon at St. Thomas’s Hospital in London was expected to examine over 200 patients in a single day. The sick often languished in filth for long periods before they received medical attention, because most hospitals were disastrously understaffed. In 1825, visitors to St. George’s Hospital discovered mushrooms and wriggling maggots thriving in the damp, soiled sheets of a patient with a compound fracture. The afflicted man, believing this to be the norm, had not complained about the conditions, nor had any of his fellow convalescents thought the squalor especially noteworthy.[2]

Worst of all was the fact that a sickening odor permeated every hospital ward. The air was thick with the stench of piss, shit, and vomit. The smell was so offensive that the staff sometimes walked around with handkerchiefs pressed to their noses. Doctors didn’t exactly smell like rose beds, either. Berkeley Moynihan—one of the first surgeons in England to use rubber gloves—recalled how he and his colleagues used to throw off their own jackets when entering the operating theater and don ancient frocks that were often stiff with dried blood and pus. They had belonged to retired members of staff and were worn as badges of honor by their proud successors, as were many items of surgical clothing.

llanionmilitaryhospitalmoreThe operating theaters within these hospitals were just as dirty as the surgeons working in them. In the early decades of the nineteenth century, it was safer to have surgery at home than it was in a hospital, where mortality rates were three to five times higher than they were in domestic settings. Those who went under the knife did so as a last resort, and so were usually mortally ill. Very few surgical patients recovered without incident. Many either died or fought their way back to only partial health. Those unlucky enough to find themselves hospitalized during this period would frequently fall prey to a host of infections, most of which were fatal in a pre-antibiotic era.

419c2b28d1b137197a21298b24a604c0In addition to the foul smells, fear permeated the atmosphere of the Victorian hospital. The surgeon John Bell wrote that it was easy to imagine the mental anguish of the hospital patient awaiting surgery. He would hear regularly “the cries of those under operation which he is preparing to undergo,” and see his “fellow-sufferer conveyed to that scene of trial,” only to be “carried back in solemnity and silence to his bed.” Lastly, he was subjected to the sound of their dying groans as they suffered the final throes of what was almost certainly their end.[3]

As horrible as these hospitals were, it was not easy gaining entry to one. Throughout the nineteenth century, almost all the hospitals in London except the Royal Free controlled inpatient admission through a system of ticketing. One could obtain a ticket from one of the hospital’s “subscribers,” who had paid an annual fee in exchange for the right to recommend patients to the hospital and vote in elections of medical staff. Securing a ticket required tireless soliciting on the part of potential patients, who might spend days waiting and calling on the servants of subscribers and begging their way into the hospital. Some hospitals only admitted patients who brought with them money to cover their almost inevitable burial. Others, like St. Thomas’ in London, charged double if the person in question was deemed “foul” by the admissions officer.[4]

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Before germs and antisepsis were fully understood, remedies for hospital squalor were hard to come by. The obstetrician James Y. Simpson suggested an almost-fatalistic approach to the problem. If cross-contamination could not be controlled, he argued, then hospitals should be periodically destroyed and built anew. Another surgeon voiced a similar view. “Once a hospital has become incurably pyemia-stricken, it is impossible to disinfect it by any known hygienic means, as it would to disinfect an old cheese of the maggots which have been generated in it,” he wrote. There was only one solution: the wholesale “demolition of the infected fabric.”[5]

fitzharris_butcheringart_021417It wasn’t until a young surgeon named Joseph Lister developed the concept of antisepsis in the 1860s that hospitals became places of healing rather than places of death.

To read more about 19th-century hospitals and Joseph Lister’s antiseptic revolution, pre-order my book THE BUTCHERING ART by clicking here. Pre-orders are incredibly helpful to new authors . Info on how to order foreign editions coming soon. Your support is greatly appreciated. 

 

1. Adrian Teal, The Gin Lane Gazette (London: Unbound, 2014).
2. F. B. Smith, The People’s Health 1830-1910 (London: Croom Helm, 1979), 262.
3. John Bell, The Principles of Surgery, Vol. III (1808), 293.
4. Elisabeth Bennion, Antique Medical Instruments (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979), 13.
5. John Eric Erichsen, On Hospitalism and the Causes of Death after Operations (London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1874), 98.

The Dead House – Episode 12 – Under The Knife

In Episode 12 of Under The Knife, I explore the grim reality facing medical students in earlier centuries when they first entered the dissection room, or “dead house,” as they called it.

Don’t forget you can now pre-order my book THE BUTCHERING ART by clicking here! And please subscribe to my YouTube Channel, and like/comment on the video!

The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice: 2 Million Hits!

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I was working on a blog post the other day when I saw the counter on my site reach 2 million hits. I had to blink twice. Two million hits?! I never dreamt that there would be so much interest in my work when I began The Chirurgeon’s Apprentice in 2010. Thanks to everyone who has supported me on this journey. It is one of my greatest pleasures in life to share medical history with you. In honor of this occasion, I’ve put together some fun stats about the blog. And don’t forget that if you’re in the US, you can now pre-order my upcoming book The Butchering Art by clicking here. 

Total Hits: 2,009,331

  • Best Day: July 27, 2014 (33,163 hits)
  • Best Month: July, 2014 (82,555 hits)

Top 3 Most Popular Articles

Social Media

  • Twitter: 24,622 (Click here to follow)
  • Facebook: 43,735 (Click here to follow)
  • Instagram: 70,586 (Click here to follow)
  • YouTube: 13,134 (Click here to subscribe)
  • Blog: 8,107 (Subscribe to the right)

Total Words Written: 142,356

Number of Countries & Territories Reached: 212.

  • Some of the most unusual include Congo, the Palestinian Territories, Syria, Micronesia, Iran, Tajikistan, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Antarctica, and my favorite: Vatican City. I see you, His Holiness!

Most Popular Search Terms: Guillotine, Plague Doctor, Neurofibromatosis, Vivisection, Corpse Medicine, Sweeney Todd, Barber-Surgeon, Syphilis Nose, The Knick, Mummy, Mermaid Syndrome.

Above artwork by the incredible cartoonist Adrian Teal

Lincoln’s Corpse – Episode 11 – Under The Knife

In Episode 11 of Under The Knife, I explore the origins of the modern funeral industry beginning with the American Civil War and the unusual embalming & burial of President Abraham Lincoln.

Don’t forget you can now pre-order my book THE BUTCHERING ART by clicking here! And please subscribe to my YouTube Channel, and like/comment on the video!